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Chicago Parenting Time Attorney

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Chicago Parenting Time Attorney

Chicago Parenting Time Attorney

Chicago parenting time cases are often complex and difficult, even when the parents have been able to reach an agreement about how they will share parenting time. Emotions are usually running high in parenting time cases, and parents can become frustrated and angry without an experienced and compassionate advocate to assist them through the case. If you will be going through a parenting time case in Chicago, it is essential to have an experienced parenting time lawyer in Chicago on your side throughout your case. At the Women’s Divorce & Family Law Group, we have years of experience helping mothers in parenting time cases. We know how complicated these kinds of cases can be, and we will advocate for your rights as a parent every step of the way. 

Common Parenting Time Issues for Our Chicago Lawyers

Under the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act (IMDMA), parenting time is now known as the allocation of parental responsibilities. As such, parents should not be expected to be awarded legal or physical parenting time in their case but rather to be allocated significant decision-making responsibilities and/or parenting time. Our lawyers in Chicago assist clients with many kinds of custody issues, including but not limited to the following:

  • Seeking parenting time;
  • Determining the best interests of the child;
  • Allocation judgments;
  • Parenting plans;
  • Parenting time restrictions;
  • Relocations; and
  • Modifications.

Significant Decision-Making Responsibilities in Chicago Parenting Time Cases

Significant decision-making responsibilities are one important part of parenting time cases in Chicago. These parental responsibilities can be allocated through an allocation judgment or through a parenting plan if the parents are able to reach an agreement. These types of responsibilities are most similar to what was known previously as “legal custody” under Illinois law.

What is included in significant decision-making responsibilities? According to the IMDMA, significant decision-making “means deciding issues of long-term importance in the life of the child.” Typically, those issues include:

  • Child’s education;
  • Child’s health care; and
  • Child’s religious upbringing in some cases.

Parenting Time and Chicago Parenting Time

Parenting time is the other type of parental responsibility that will be allocated in your parenting time case. Parenting time is most similar to what was known previously as physical custody and visitation. According to the IMDMA, parenting time “means the time during which a parent is responsible for exercising caretaking functions and non-significant decision-making responsibilities with respect to the child.” Examples of caretaking functions discussed in the IMDMA include but are not limited to:

  • Satisfying the child’s nutritional needs, including providing meals and snacks;
  • Managing the child’s bedtime;
  • Guiding the child’s language development and personal growth;
  • Providing discipline for the child;
  • Ensuring that the child goes to school;
  • Helping the child to develop friendships and other interpersonal relationships;
  • Taking the child to health care appointments; and
  • Providing both moral and ethical guidance for the child.

Contact a Chicago Parenting Time Lawyer for More Information

Do you need assistance with a parenting time case in Chicago? These cases can be complicated, but our experienced Chicago parenting time lawyers can assist you. Contact Women’s Divorce & Family Law Group to learn more about the parenting time and other family law services we provide in the Chicago area.

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